The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: June 12 – 18, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

Screen Shot 2019-06-17 at 8.42.30 PM

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Event Leviathan #1

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis

Artist:  Alex Maleev

First, I do not understand the title. 

Second, I do not need to.

Event Leviathan promises to be the event of the summer and is written by a dude who knows something about constructing summer events. With a goal of streamlining the covert agencies of the DC Universe as a backdrop, Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev take on the DC characters – specifically a group of DC detectives – in what is labeled a “mystery thriller” and the first chapter delivers on all cylinders.

Maleev is the perfect artist for the kind of street-level story the first issue of Event Leviathan seems to be. He clearly is enjoying this high profile DC event and is reveling in working with his frequent collaborator Bendis. The two seem to play to each others’ strengths and that bodes well for this title.

The joy of the book is found in the most quiet moments and the best – by far – is the dialogue between Batman and Lois Lane. In a book that suggests high stakes are afoot, this type of small scene is welcome and brilliant.

This is Bendis at his best. This is events comics at their best. This is the oddly titled Event Leviathan. It might be the best book of the summer.

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel, Marvel Comics

Thank You, Dad | Father’s Day 2019



I am very grateful to Dad today.

The summer, especially June, especially in my family, is filled with celebrations. We have many, many birthdays and anniversaries and we tend to get together for each one of these events or, at least, celebrate them in combination when we are together.

Father’s Day is, of course, one of these celebrations and something very obvious occurs to me on the occasion of this Father’s Day: without my father, we would not be getting together for any of these events. In fact, this combination of people would not be getting together at all. Some of us most of us would not even be alive.

It’s obvious, I know. It’s how families work: a mom and a dad get together and begats began begetting. I understand. And, equally obviously, without our mother, we’d not be around either but today is about Dad and the following is true of him:

  • Dad instilled in us a deep love of family. He was deeply loyal and incredibly protective. My mothers and sisters inhabit that space he left us.
  • Dad was incredibly dry and funny and the whole family continues to lovingly joke with and tease each other just the way Dad did.
  • Dad cared about serving others and I think he would be so proud of the lives his children and grandchildren have chosen and are choosing.
  • Dad loved food and gatherings and all of us around a table and, try as I might, I cannot avoid the continuation of family celebrations. In truth I do not want to

I know that not everyone has the father and grandfather my sisters and were blessed to have. We were blessed and every day, my dad influences my life. No one is ever really gone, right? Dad is not. He lives in days like Father’s Day but he lives in each of us as well and in the many people his life of service touched and in the lives his family continues to touch

Happy Father’s Day, Old Man. And thank you.

 

 

IMG_20170810_0115

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Dad, Fathers and Daughters, Fathers and Sons, Fathers Day, Holidays

Link’n’Blog – 6.13.19: Sucker for Jo Bros

Related Content from And There Came A Day



I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

I can’t help it (and I don’t want to), I LOVE this song!

You can decide which version you like best:

Leave a comment

Filed under Link'n'Blog, Star Wars

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: June 5 – 11, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Young Justice #6

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis

Artist:  John Timms

There were more “important” issues this week. There were more classic issues this week. But no comic this week made me smile as much as Young Justice #6. I was not a major fan of Young Justice during its heyday, I will admit, but I simply love what Brian Michael Bendis is doing with the characters. While I certain he has a plan to re-introduce them to the world and to the other heroes in the DC Universe, he has decided to drop readers and the team into the middle of impossible action and sort things out later.

Awesome.

The art by John Timms is absolutely the perfect counterpoint to the story and he captures young people amazingly well which I have noted in other installments must be harder to do than one might think as so many artists seem to have so much trouble doing so. I hope Timms stays around on the book.

And I hope readership is solid. Young Justice is fun, funny and over-the-top. It’s a perfect summer comic book!

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel, Marvel Comics

Columbine – A Book Review


Related Content from And There Came A Day



Columbine by Dave Cullen is utterly engrossing, disturbing and moving. Exhaustively research and intricately told, this story about sadness, violence and its aftermath pulls the reader in from the first paragraph and keeps its hooks in until the last. The players in the story become more than characters, they become people we know and understand. The events of the tragedy become more than plot points, the become signposts of change in the lives of those directly affected and in ours. Columbine is a brilliant piece of investigative journalism that sheds light on a crucible moment when, it is not too hyperbolic to say, the world completely changed.

Perhaps the most shocking thing about the book should not shock us anymore: the narrative of the attackers and the attacks is almost entirely wrong. Much of the misinformation and myth of the story of the Columbine High School shootings is being dispelled, especially as we approach the 20th anniversary of the massacre, but the pieces that hang on – the ideas of outcast gunmen, the trench coat mafia, the targeting of specific students, the girl who said “yes” – remain almost fixed in place as if dispelling them would somehow to a disservice to the memories of those who were lost and changed by this day.

As a high school administrator, I can say that my colleagues should, conversely, read this book immediately and avoid it patently. We should read it to allow ourselves into the important what if journey and to open ourselves to the more critical what can we do question. We should not read it because it is a terrifying and maddening experience invoking sadness and confusion and helplessness.

I am not one to avoid truths and there are many to uncover in Columbine. I can write with certainly that I am forever changed having read it.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review, Books

Link’n’Blog – 6.7.19: The Last Blockbuster

Related Content from And There Came A Day



I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

As a former video store employee in my youth, this one hits very close to my nostalgic heart.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Link'n'Blog, Star Wars

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 29 – June 4, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Doomsday Clock #10

Writer: Geoff Johns

Artists:  Gary Frank

This is the issue I have been waiting for. This issue redefines how the DC Universe functions, how we look at it and how it will proceed for years to come. This is Geoff Johns at the top of his game and Gary Frank turning in the best art of his amazing career. This is what we all signed on for and, if we can allow for the amount of time between issues, we can embrace Doomsday Clock as, perhaps, the best book of the year. Maybe of the last five.


Geoff Johns’ encyclopedic knowledge of the DC Universe has never been on better display than it is here. The manner in which he treats the various retconned origins of Superman and the ramifications of each action of Dr. Manhattan is breathtaking. If the plan was not present before this issue, it surely is now.

Gary Frank should be nominated and win an Eisner for his work on Doomsday Clock. Yes, it has taken time. YES, it is worth it.

This is the seminal book of the DC Universe at the moment. I hope the publisher follows through on the promise of it.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel, Marvel Comics