Link’n’Blog – 3.22.19: Batman’s 80th!

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

This week, DC Comics releases Detective Comics #1000! Let’s take a moment to celebrate all things BATMAN!

 

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: March 12 – 19, 2019

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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Superman #9

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis

Artists: Ivan Reis, Brandon Peterson

Ivan Reis remains one of the very best pencillers working in comics today. And his command of the Man of Steel is all but perfect. His work defines Superman for this generation of comics readers very much in the way Curt Swan did in the 1970s. This Superman is strong but human, heroic but approachable, calm but with a simmering passion. Reis, who is not the fastest worker in the business, is well paired with Brandon Petersson whose flashback pages are both in keeping with the style Reis has established and visually distinct enough to indicate the time shift. They are a great team.

What writer Bendis is doing in the Superman titles is fascinating to watch as he somehow balances the “super” and the “man” seemingly with ease and makes Lois Lane and Jon Kent critical players in the stories he’s crafting, not bystanders who feel shoehorned into the proceedings. His Superman stories are destined to be classics. Get on board!

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Link’n’Blog – 3.15.19: ENDGAME

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

There is only one thing to Link’n’Blog about this week:

 

 

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: March 6 – 12, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Doomsday Clock #9

Writer: Geoff Johns

Artists: Gary Frank

Each issue of Doomsday Clock has surpassed the last and issue number 9 is no exception. Truly beginning to deliver on the promise of something as massive as a crossover between the Watchmen and “normal” DC universe, Doomsday Clock #9 hits the right notes as writer Geoff Johns showcases Dr. Manhattan’s inevitable face-to-face conflict with many heroes of the DC universe. That Johns is saving Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman for a later issue only makes sense.

The threads of the story are finally coming together and the overall narrative is falling into place. One can only hope that the entire line reflects some of the inevitable impacts of this event – though given the publishing schedule and the other things happening in DC continuity right now (hello, Heroes in Crisis) I am not entirely sure how that is possible.

Regardless, Doomsday Clock seems as though it will stand on its own as a very beautifully drawn (Gary Frank is off the charts in this issue in particular), brilliantly written book.

Not everything needs to connect, does it?

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Captain Marvel – A SPOILER FREE Movie Review


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Releasing this film on the International Day of Women was no mistake by the makers of Captain Marvel for one goal of the movie – and this is a goal at which the film absolutely succeeds – is to tell a tale of independence and empowerment for its main character. The title character is powerful, confident and clever. She is funny, independent and empowered. Her story is the story of a superhero and there is barely a moment spent – for humorous purposes or otherwise – where anyone questions the fact that, if she is not the most powerful person in the room, she is well on her way to becoming that.

The movie gets a lot of mileage out of the fact that its title character does not quite remember her entire history. A series of inter-cutting flashbacks (which anyone who has seen the trailers has watched) reveal bits and pieces of conflicting history to Captain Marvel and part of the fun of the movie is walking along with her as she attempts to unravel how these images work together to make her whole.

Brie Larson is wonderfully cast in the title role. She looks perfect in each incarnation of the costume, and that is a critical thing for anyone playing a superhero – sometimes these costumes look silly. Larson has the gravitas to carry it off, even when her hair pokes through her helmet like a mohawk. And, though her character is on a quest to find out exactly who she is during the course of the movie, Larson’s Captain Marvel never doubts herself. She may not be in control of her history, but she is completely in control of herself. As Captain Marvel is set up as one of if not the most powerful characters in the Marvel Movie Universe, the casting had to be spot on. It is.

Set in the 1990s, Captain Marvel takes on a terrifically 1990s movie trope – the buddy comedy – and plays that out to entertaining effect. Samuel L. Jackson is on board as a young, two-eyed Nick Fury and he is having a tremendous amount of fun. The pairing of Larson and Jackson works and the friendship between the characters is the backbone of the movie. That computers seamlessly de-age Jackson about 20 years is pretty cool and pretty scary (and what they do for castmate Clark Gregg as a young Phil Coulson is equally cool and/or creepy).

Ben Mendelshon is, likewise, having a ton of fun as leader of the antagonist alien race – the shapeshifting Skrulls. This is an actor who knows how to chew scenery in the best way and he does so with aplomb here.

Annette Benning continues a noble tradition of the addition of an A-List actor (see Brando, Marlon, Nicholson, Jack, Redford, Robert, Close, Glenn and others) to a comic book film and, much like her compatriots, looks like she’s having a terrific time as well. And Jude Law is the perfect mentor to Larson’s Captain Marvel.

But it’s Captain Marvel who is at the heart of the story and her friendship with Maria Rambeau (delightfully played by Lashana Lynch) and Maria’s daughter Monica (played by Akira Akbar) is the most important to the movie. The relationship between these characters is perfectly pitched and utterly in sync with the overall themes of the movie…

… which are hard to delve into in a spoiler free review. Suffice it to say that Captain Marvel employs more twists and turns than other Marvel movies and all of them land very nicely. The movie keeps the audience on its heels and, hey, we’re talking about the 21st Marvel movie in the last 10 years. That this one continues to surprise is absolutely saying something.

There is world building here. There is world bridging here (yes, the audience gets a sense of a part of the forthcoming Avengers: Endgame) and there are thrills to be had in all of this.

If there is a drawback, and this may well have something to do with the saturation of the genre, some of the scenes seem a bit telegraphed. This is not to say they are not enjoyable. The entire movie is one empowering hoot. Rather, this is to say that even good scenes that are overly familiar can only have so much effect. And, to be fair, it’s not Captain Marvel’s fault that Wonder Woman beat it to some thematic punches.

These are minor quibbles. This is a very fun movie and a fitting installment in the overall Marvel saga. Come for the great characters and the kitty cat, stay for the TWO post credit sequences.

CAPTAIN MARVEL receives FOUR FLERKINS out of a possible FIVE

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On the Basis of Sex – A Movie Review


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It took The Cinnamon Girl and I way too long to get to On the Basis of Sex. Way too long. When we got to see it a few weeks back before the Academy Awards, we looked at each other and said “why did we wait so long?”

Felicity Jones is marvelous cast as Ruth Bader Ginsberg, an absolute, real life hero whose story is being told while she is still with us. That’s a rarity and a blessing to be sure. Jones’ Ginsberg is just what one wants in a hero: determined, uncompromising, compassionate, loyal and incredibly smart. She will likely make a career out of playing such roles and she should. She is self assured in her choices and her work in On the Basis of Sex is terrific.

Jones is clearly the lead here and the movie depends entirely on her performance. Thankfully, it is spectacular.

She is ably supported by a strong cast. Armie Hammer, who I find terrific and just one break away from being a superstar, takes not one ounce of the spotlight away from Jones as Martin Ginsberg, Bader Ginsberg’s husband. Theirs is a well-drawn, devoted relationship and one that forms a terrific backdrop to the themes of the film. It is not a stereotypical marriage that one might expect of the era in which the movie occurs, rather the challenges the Bader Ginsberg faces as she inches ever closer to the glass ceiling are played out delicately and believably within her relationship with Martin and Hammer is perfect in the role.

Also important though, perhaps, a bit more one note, is Cailee Spaeny as Jane Ginsberg, who has come of age watching her mother approach but never quite tap on the above mentioned ceiling. The mother-daughter dynamics are by-the-book, but they work in the overall context of the movie and Spaeny’s Jane is a critical part of keeping the themes moving forward.

Justin Theroux, Kathy Bates and the ever terrific Sam Waterston are excellent in their roles as well and director Mimi Leder keeps the entire movie on pace and builds in enough suspense to keep the audience engaged until the final scene.

Having not yet watched the CNN documentary about RBG, I can only hope On the Basis of Sex is a realistic account of the woman’s early life because it is an inspiring one.

ON THE BASIS OF SEX receives FOUR and a HALF REAL LIFE HEROES out of a possible FIVE

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Link’n’Blog – 3.8.19: Principal Administrators!

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

I am so proud of two of my good friends and fellow Catholic University of American alums, Sean Gaillard and Greg Shillinger, who are both up for state-wide and national recognition as administrators of the year!  Sean has already been named his region’s principal of the year.

What terrific guys and what terrific educators!

Lucky to know them!

 

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