The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: October 7 – 13, 2020

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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Batman #100

Writer: James Tynion IV

Artists: Jorge Jimenez

It is no surprise that I would select last week’s Batman #100 as the best comic I read. Likely, many such lists included this issue as a top comic. A gripping conclusion to what has been a fun, frantic and emotional arc, Batman #100 promises big things as all such anniversary issues should, and it delivers.

I’ve noted before that James Tynion, IV had a tough act to follow when he took the reins on this title and he has exceeded expectations. Invigorating a book that didn’t need much new energy, Tynion has breathed new life and history into Batman’s amazing rogue’s gallery while introducing concepts and characters of his own that will resonate in the Bat-mythos for years to come. He has also brought the Batman Family into the foreground again and, while these shifts to and away from the supporting cast are somewhat cyclic, I – for one – am glad to see Batman embracing the family.

And, as a result of the Joker War, Nightwing is Nightwing again. That, in-and-of-itself, is cause for celebration.

I’ve said this about other artists before, but I’d like Jorge Jimenez to draw all the comics, okay? He’s stunning and his work on this book has rocketed him into the upper ecehlon of comic artists.

What comes next? I don’t know, but I will be around to see it.

That a terrific book this is.

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Link’n’Blog – 9.11.2020 | The Rising

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

Never forget… together we rise.

Come on up…

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: September 2 – 8, 2020

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

 

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Batman #98

Writer: James Tynion IV

Artists: Jorge Jimenez

For two weeks ago, I selected Batman as the best comic I read over the course of the week, and I have selected Batman again.

This is deja vu as, when Tom King was writing Batman, I found myself choosing it more often than not as the best book of the week. King had a rotating cast of artists with whom he worked, current Batman scribe James Tynion IV has relied primarily on Jorge Jimenez and, as I’ve noted before, the two have been incredible together.

I could write about the story and the dynamics that hold it together, but how about I save that for Batman #100 which is bound to show up on this list. Rather, I will do something I rarely do: I will share the page that put this book over the top for me this month.

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Tenet – A Spoiler Free Movie Review


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MV5BYzg0NGM2NjAtNmIxOC00MDJmLTg5ZmYtYzM0MTE4NWE2NzlhXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTA4NjE0NjEy._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,666,1000_AL_It was a long time coming… after not being in theaters for months (like the rest of the world) The Cinnamon Girl and I kicked off the holiday weekend with a viewing of Christopher Nolan’s latest twister, Tenet. We saw the movie at an AMC Theater where signs indicating mandatory mask wearing, arrows on the floors and limited capacity theaters were all in place. There were 5 people in the theater for this early evening show, 3 of us family. Masks remained on except when eating and drinking (I cannot go to the movies without popcorn) and I felt as safe during the film as I do when going to the store or going to a school – my place of work. I felt comfortable enough to go back. The question is whether it will be to see Tenet again. Frankly, it just might. An intellectually challenging thrill ride, Tenet has only gotten better in the days since we saw it. I have spent much time – more, perhaps, than I should have, considering and analyzing it, wondering about its twists and turns and conclusion. There is much on which to ruminate following a viewing of Tenet and it will likely be an all the more rich film upon a second viewing. Of course, part of the fun with Christopher Nolan movies of late is to not spoil the plot elements or the twists and I will certainly not do that here. However, as anyone who has seen the film could attest, it is all but impossible to discuss the story without giving something away in the description. Let us leave it at this: the world is at stake. Forces are working together to save it. Forces are working together to destroy it. It is not always easy to delineate which forces are which but, damn, if it isn’t fun! What can be discussed is the cast and they are stellar from top to bottom. It would seem that Nolan has his pick of up-and-coming actors and to have John David Washington, Robert Pattinson and Elizabeth Debicki in the same film at this moment in their careers seems almost too prescient. Washington is the lead and he is riveting as a man who seems to know less than the audience does about what is happening around him, but he moves forward with deadly skill, deep confidence and, at times, a sense of fun. The movie could have used a little bit more of that fun in him, but it leaves the comedic relief in the hands of Pattinson who is every bit up to the challenge. His Neil is a fascinating character and, as much as the movie wants us to keep guessing, it is Neil who is at the center of most of the questions. Debicki delivers a taut and engaging performance and is never far from the center of the story. Without her, the film does not work. Add to this trio Kenneth Branagh’s magnificent turn as Sator, who may or may not be the villain of the piece, and a supporting cast with the likes of Michael Caine, Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Himesh Patel and you have a cast worth spending another 2.5 hours with. But the movie itself it what compels me. There are fun questions to unravel and I know that, watching the movie again knowing what’s to come will be even more satisfying than the first viewing. There are only two elements keeping Tenet from being perhaps Nolan’s best film. The aforementioned lack of mirth is a thing. The movie takes itself perhaps a bit too seriously. More humor would have been welcome. It also has an audio track that is muddy in the extreme. It’s almost as though Nolan has asked the actors to deliver their lines in homage to Tom Hardy’s Bane… Rarely do I think “I can’t wait to watch this with subtitles” but I felt that impulse here. However, the movie triumphs over these weaknesses and, though I would not say anyone should venture to a theater if they are uncomfortable, I would say you’ll love this when you see it at home. TENET receives FOUR PALINDROMES out of a possible FIVE

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Link’n’Blog – 9.7.2020 | PERFECTION Jurassic Style

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

Perhaps you have heard that original Jurassic Park stars Jeff Goldblum, Sam Neill and Laura Dern are reprising their roles for Jurassic Park: Dominion when the latest film hits theaters.

Goldblum and Neill seem happy to be working together again as you can see HERE from Entertainment Weekly.

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Link’n’Blog – 8.28.2020 | Two Kings

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

Chadwick Bozeman. Gone far too soon… 

Hopefully, you have read the accounts of Bozeman’s connection with Denzel Washington. If you have not, People has a great article HERE.

WAKANDA (and BOZEMAN) FOREVER!

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: August 19 – 25, 2020

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Batman #97

Writer: James Tynion IV

Artists: Jorge Jimenez

For two weeks in a row, a Batman title was the best comic I read last week… first Detective Comics and now Batman. There are some amazing things going on in the world of the caped crusader and the teams on these books are operating at very high levels.

When writer James Tynion’s Joker War story arc began, I was concerned that I was going to be turned off by the “Gotham City is plunged into darkness – again” antics the plot promised. But I have been pleasantly surprised.

It’s not that we haven’t been knee deep in that kind of story. We have. On the heals of City of Bane, Joker War forces the question as to why anyone would ever make Gotham their home. Rather than leave readers in that place, Tynion uses the Joker’s antics as a springboard to introduce a series of new characters and, in doing so, raises the stakes in the decades long conflict between Batman and the Joker. 

Of the many new characters making the scene, I will highlight the delightful and deviant Punchline and the equally disturbing Clown Killer as two inspired creations. I think these two will have legs, if they survive the story…

Batman is really clicking and this arc has been at its best with Jorge Jimenez on the art. His work is career defining. Coming off a great stint on Justice League, Jimenez has turned it up a notch with Batman and we are all the better for it. He’s giving the audience amazing stuff.

Engaging, powerful and brash, the Joker War is firing on all cylinders. 


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Link’n’Blog – 8.21.2020 | The ‘Stache is Back

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

I loved the remake of Murder on the Orient Express and I loved Kenneth Branaugh’s vision and his… mustache! 

Death on the Nile, with another terrific cast, will be coming soon… I cannot wait.

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: August 12 – 18, 2020

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

 

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Detective Comics #1025

Writer: Peter J. Tomasi

Artists: Kenneth Rocafort

The under-the-radar Batman title that we comic readers are not talking about enough is Peter J. Tomasi’s Detective Comics. Tomasi is a terrific writer but, for some reason, his arcs don’t get the same love that the arcs in Batman do. I am not sure why.

Tomasi weaves intricate plots that feature a Batman for the ages, one that stands somehow apart from the main book as a different and more timeless Caped Crusader. This is not to suggest that Detective Comics is independent of the amazing events in Batman, but that this book illustrates the quintessential approaches Batman would take.

Tomasi understands the character, the supporting cast and the rogues gallery as well as any writer dealing with Batman. And it seems his editors have had the sense to let him play… that’s a very good call.

The talented Brad Walker, who is a terrific partner to Tomasi, has been on the title for more than a few issues and his work is terrific. But this Joker War fill in issue has the best work from Kenneth Rocafort in years, and that is saying something. There is a richness here that is special, and a depth in the work that cries out for him to be on a Bat title once again.

Don’t sleep on Detective Comics. It’s every bit as good as Batman. 


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Link’n’Blog – 8.14.2020 | Aretha Franklin and Opera

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

Earlier this week, I ran across a story I had read before about Aretha Franklin saving the 1998 Grammys… if you haven’t heard it, it goes like this: the incomparable Aretha was at the Grammys to preform with the cast of Blues Brothers 2000 when producers got word that Luciano Pavarotti was going to be unable to come to the show to sing Nessun Dorma and they would need to replace him.

The rest of the story, you can read HERE and you can watch below what happened next.

It’s amazing.

RESPECT. 

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