Teach & Serve No. 28 – There Are Leaders and There Are Those Who Lead

Teach & Serve 

No. 28 * February 24, 2016


Related Content from And There Came A Day:


There Are Leaders and There Are Those Who Lead

People who have spent a significant amount of time studying leadership look to their supervisors, their bosses, their superiors and note a disconnect between the principles of good leadership and what is going on in some of their schools.

I have spent the last three weeks of my professional life with groups of educational professionals who have been sent by their administrations to take part in workshops that are about, on one level or another, leadership. Some have formal leadership roles in their schools – principals, assistant principals, deans of students, department chairs, program directors, coaches – and some have informal leadership in their schools, wielding influence at their institutions in various manners both subtle and overt.

There weeks have been terrific and the overwhelming majority of the people with whom I’ve spent time reassures me that the future of school leadership is in very, very good hands. Committed, conscientious and compassionate, most of the people with whom I’ve worked these last weeks have affected me, have made me think back with great fondness to my years in schools and have inspired me to think what great institutions could be constructed if these people were the building blocks.

Yet, at some point these weeks it occurred to me that back in the “real world,” back at their schools when they are plying their trade in the trenches – as it were – many of these very people who have spent a significant amount of time studying leadership look to their supervisors, their bosses, their superiors and note a disconnect between the principles of good leadership and what is going on in some of their schools.

I have read Simon Sinek (and, if you’re interested in leadership, you should, too – Start with Why is particularly good) and watched his TED talks and one of the maxims I have heard him say is simply true: there is a difference between leaders and those who lead.

Flow ChartTake a look at a school organizational chart. Schools are lousy with formal leaders. From presidents to principals and on down the diagram, there is no shortage of “leaders” in schools. In fact, some schools are shockingly top heavy with leadership.

What there might be a shortage of is people who actually lead.

Show me a school with people in leadership positions who actually lead and I will show you a schools that is unafraid, that is humble, that is ready to innovate, collaborate and change, that is positioned to charge into an unknown future safe in the knowledge that it knows why it does what it does. Show me a school with people who lead and I will show you a school with more fulfilled and empowered employees than not, more teachers energized by their work, more students sharing responsibility their learning, more successful outcomes. Show me a school with leaders who lead and I will show you a school that I would support, a school to which I would send my children, a school in which I would want to serve.

Show me a school with leaders who lead. Please.

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Filed under Education, Education Blog, Ignatian Education, Jesuit Education, Teach & Serve, Teacher, Teacher, Teacher Blog, Teaching, Teaching Blog

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