Monthly Archives: May 2019

Link’n’Blog – 5.31.19: On EDGE!

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

As if I could be more excited for GALAXY’S EDGE…

The Launch of Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge at Disneyland

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 22 – 28, 2019

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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

Screen Shot 2019-05-27 at 3.25.34 PM

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Action Comics #1011

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis

Artists:  Steve Epting

Brian Michael Bendis has been building his Superman stories to the Event Leviathan and this installment is top notch. Plot threads are coming together and the stakes feel appropriately high as we reach the start of the Event Levithan miniseries. 

What I really enjoy about Bendis’ take on Superman is that his interpretation of the character is grounded. This seems to be a very difficult balance to pull off but Bendis handles it beautifully His Superman is Clark Kent in costume and Clark Kent is a husband, father and hero. Approaching the character in this fashion is something that few authors can handle. Bendis makes it look easy.

Steve Epting is a tremendous addition to both Action Comics and to the DC Universe. His realistic style goes hand-in-hand with this story. But when superpowers are in play, he delivers and the contrast between the more talky panels and his approach to action is wonderful. 

Superman hasn’t been in this good of hands in years.

 

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Filed under Action Comics, Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Superman, Weekly Comic Book Review

Link’n’Blog – 5.24.19: Star Trek | Picard!

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

Star Trek Picard is on the horizon…

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 15 – 21, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Batman #71

Writer: Tom King

Artists: Jorge Fornes, Michael Janin

The saga that is the latest breaking of the Batman written by Tom King is rapidly approaching its conclusion and the Bat-Band is getting back together… if any of what is seemingly going on can be trusted. So twisty (in a very good way) is King’s writing that it is difficult to rely on what is being presented on the pages. That is just fine. King has developed a vernacular for Batman which incorporates the best of Grant Morrison and Scott Snyder and strikes an impressive middle ground between the two iconic Batman writers.

The art in the King run has been consistently amazing and this month’s edition upholds the standard. Michael Janin gets better with each passing issue, sometimes evolving panel-to-panel. Paired this month with Jorge Fornes’ David Mazzuchelli homages, Janin really shines. This book would be terrific even in the hands of lesser artists. That it is drawn by quality pencillers like these is simply a bonus.

I will read this entire arc again as it concludes so that I can more readily see the pieces fit together. This could be King’s best Batman work yet…

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Rocketman – A SPOILER FREE Movie Review


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Taron Egerton has arrived. Make no mistake about this point. Following his work as Elton John in the explosive, propulsive and ebullient Rocketman, Egerton leaps from nice actor to leading man.

“Leaps” is it the correct verb.

His work in the movie will, likely, be endlessly compared to Rami Malek’s as Freddie Mercury in last year’s Bohemian Rhapsody. Obviously, Malek was terrific (and took home the Best Actor Academy Award) but Egerton goes him one better. In Bohemian Rhapsody Malek provided an almost note perfect impression of Mercury. In Rocketman, Egerton makes the audience believe he is Elton John and when the movie launches into a frame-by-frame recreation of one of the singer’s most iconic music videos, Egerton owns it in a way only a performer can. He does not simply ape Elton John, he becomes him and, for the run of the movie, manages to replace him.

It is amazing work.

From its opening scene, Rocketman tells the audience that it is not a rote biopic and, for some, I suspect that will be a bit off putting. The trailers have only hinted at the extent that the tagline “Based on a True Fantasy” is an operative directive for this movie. Believe it. This movie, while concerned with telling Elton John’s amazing and often quite sad story, is not preoccupied with delivering in pseudo-documentary fashion. Rather it invites the audience into the frenzy and fashion and frenzy of Elton John’s life and it does so rather well.

Egerton is terrific and does remarkable work with Elton John’s music. In the run up to the movie, it seemed an odd choice not to use the music icon’s voice and accompaniments during the movie, but the structure of the film more than justifies this decision and Egerton holds up his end of the bargain. Supported by Jamie Bell and collaborator Bernie Taupin and Richard Madden as unscrupulous manager John Reid (along with a dark turn by an all but unrecognizable Bryce Dallas Howard as Elton John’s mother), Egerton explodes off the screen in musical numbers that are electric and in despair that is endless.

The movie looks amazing with a production design that befits the flamboyance of the lead character and each time period in Elton John’s life is masterfully recreated. That director Dexter Fletcher was able to mount this production while pinch hitting in the eleventh hour on the troubled Bohemian Rhapsody is something of a feat in-and-of-itself.

There are a few moments where Rocketman seems to struggle against itself, losing its momentum as it illustrates scene after scene of Elton John’s struggles with self doubt and isolation. Perhaps this is by design – as the character bogs down in his challenges, the movie does as well. That it sacrifices a bit of the excitement of the early reels in this shift is to be expected and it does regain its energy with a terrific number by the end. Rocketman ends as a wonderful if sometimes distressing love song about one of the greatest pop artists of all time and does so – seemingly – without sugar coating its subject. It is not perfect, but it is perfectly earnest and engaging. And the performance by its star alone makes it worth seeing.

ROCKETMAN receives FOUR CRIES FOR HELP out of a possible FIVE

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Long Shot – A Movie Review


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Both Charlize Theron and Seth Rogen are incredibly likable in Long Shot, a romantic comedy, beauty and the beast story that places old acquaintances Theron (as the Secretary of State) and Rogen (as a crusading, social justice warrior) in each others’ paths 20 years after their last contact. That last contact was a particularly embarrassing one of Rogen and a particularly important one for Theron.

Long Shot‘s stars a loaded with charisma and share a surprising amount of chemistry as they make their way through a plot line that the audience has seen before: boy and girl re-meet after years, boy and girl think they like each other, obstacles get in the way of their budding romance, boy and girl have to decide what they will do for their love.

I’ve got chills. They’re multiplyin’.

No one, however, in under any delusions that Long Shot is Shakespeare and no one needs to be. Long Shot, primarily, falls nicely into the respected and time-honored genre of romantic comedies and it works very nicely as one. Theron is a remarkable actress, but she never feels here that she is above the material. Rather she seems like she is having a terrific time. And Rogen, who can be incredibly funny, tamps down his more overt antics in favor of creating a character that might actually be able to exist in Theron’s world. The movie does a great job selling this relationship and giving it just enough emotional heft to carry the film.

However, there are moments in Long Shot where it is clear the movie loses track of what it wants to be. Is it going to be a romantic comedy of old or a raunchy comedy of today. In trying too hard to straddle this line, Long Shot squanders potential. Much more a romantic comedy, the movie seems disjointed and trying too hard each time it introduces and over-the-top sequence in an attempt to shock to amuse.

But, as a slight and fun diversion, one could do much worse than taking a flyer on it. Long Shot delivers more than enough laughs as it relies on the wattage of its stars to justify a viewing… if you like this sort of thing. And it does something else that lovers of this genre demand: it gives the audience a wrap up to let us know where the characters go after the end credits!

LONG SHOT receives THREE AND A HALF SECRET SERVICE MEN out of a possible FIVE







LONG SHOT receives THREE AND A HALF SECRET SERVICE MEN out of a possible FIVE

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Link’n’Blog – 5.17.19: Miracle Boss

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I loved Lincoln Logs when I was a kid. Though I never entertained the idea that I would be a designer, engineer or architect, something about putting together these wooden and plastic pieces was simply simple fun. Connecting to ideas through the blogosphere seems similar to this pursuit, hence the title of this weekly post. Each Friday, I intend to post something interesting I’ve read out there on the internets. Hopefully others will find these posts as fun or thought provoking as I have.

Do yourself a favor, click the link below and listen to Bruce Springsteen’s newest release There Goes My Miracle.

And, if you have the time (and you should MAKE it) try Hello Sunshine.

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