Category Archives: Comic Books

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: July 29 – August 4, 2020

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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Batman and Superman #10

Writer: Joshua Williamson

Artist: Clayton Henry

Without question, the best part of Batman and Superman is the dynamic between DC’s two oldest and most famous characters. Writer Joshua Williamson nails the relationship in panel-after-panel and in issue after issue of this latest reboot of the series. His take on the icons is that they are friends with history, not just begrudging allies. His take is that they know each other perhaps better than they know themselves. His take is they are the cornerstones of their respective universe.

It’s a great take.

Clayton Henry is a terrific fit for the tone of the book. His Superman is grand. His Batman is moody. His layouts are solid and the expressions he renders are distinct and clever. He’s not yet a star, but he’s on his way.

The story is greatly aided by the use of a villain I really enjoy: the Ultra Humanite. Williamson has a great sense of this character, too. And UH should be a formidable opponent to the Dark Knight and the Man of Steel. Hopefully, this will be a start to an ongoing place of menace within the DC Universe.


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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: July 7 – 13, 2020

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Superman #23

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis

Artist: Kevin Maguire and John Timms

Superman has come back to life in this new era of publishing and has not missed a beat. With the steady, creative and, somehow, always surprising hand of Brian Michael Bendis at the helm, I should not be particularly surprised. Leading the Man of Steel from one plot driven crisis to another is exciting in-and-of-itself, but the real magic here is found in Clark’s interactions with the other denizens of the DC Universe.

This month, Doctor Fate and Superman converse for the first (not really) time and their chemistry is terrific. Bendis has consistently delivered these moments and they have been wonderful to read. They bring a smile to my face each time I read one. The exchange throughout this issue is particularly fun.

John Timms is rapidly becoming one of my favorite artists and, though his style is radically different from bookmate Kevin Maguire here, he more than holds his own.

Maguire is a master. Has been for years. This month, he delivers the single best panel I’ve seen in… forever. Way to go dad or mom taking the picture (if you’ve read the issue you know what I mean) and way to go Kevin McGuire!




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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: Don’t Call it a Comeback…

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Let’s Go!

As the comic book world has come back to life or, at least, come back to a regular publishing schedule, I am happy to have enough new comics to read to return to a weekly, comic book review post.

I have missed this!

Re-beginning next week, The Best Sequential Art returns!

I am eager to reengage this passion.

With real life heroes all around us, the world of superheroes will have to work hard to catch up…

With DC releasing their Death Metal event and Marvel unleashing Empyre along with Johnathan Hickman’s continuing take on The X-Men and Brian Michael Bendis on the Superman (and related) titles, there is a lot to which I am looking forward.


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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: POSTPONED

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics Are On Hold…

For the first time in over five years, I did not publish a The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week post on this blog. Comic books, like much of the rest of the world, are on hold.

Clearly, there are much more important things going on in society than the effects the corona virus are wrecking on the comic book industry. Lives are being lost, being impacted, being redefined. A certain uncertainty and dread is present for many. It’s palpable.

I know that the business itself is not always the most stable and reliable under the best of circumstances. While billions of dollars are realized in movies and tv shows featuring comic book heroes, the industry that spawned them and publishes them on a continual basis has struggled for years. Those who work in it do so out of their love for the characters the medium.

The industry is imperiled. It is struggling. It is not, for the first time in my lifetime, producing weekly product. There are no new comic books in stores, brick and mortar or digital, right now.

There is no sequential art to review.

So, for the foreseeable future I will mothball this weekly feature. In its place, I will publish a periodic “Best Sequential Art I’ve Ever Read” spotlighting storylines and creators and books I have loved. I am looking forward to that.

But, today as I write, I want to thank those creators who have fueled my imagination and fired my mind for 50 years. I want to thank them as they continue to serve those who love this quintessential American art form by supporting comic book stores and creators during this time. They are connecting with fans, holding auctions, doing fund and awareness raisers and, generally illustrating the fact that comic book creators know who true heroes really are.

Sometimes, they are true heroes themselves.

Next week, the first “Best Sequential Art I’ve Ever Read” post will go live.

This week? I just bid on an auction piece by the amazing Jerry Ordway…

Long live heroes.




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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: February 5 – 11, 2020

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was X-Men/Fantastic Four #1

Writer: Chip Zdarsky

Artist: Terry Dodson

Is there anything Marvel Comics is not currently doing exactly right with their X-Men re-imagining? I cannot think of one thing. They have allowed one of the greatest living comic writers to redefine the universe in a sweeping expansive way. They have involved other creators – writers and artists- to find corners of the world in which to play. They have slowly rolled out a comprehensive and exciting new status quo.

Now they produce a cross over by fan favorite Chip Zdarsky and all time legend Terry Dodson. Zdarsky knows what he’s doing with the characters ; he knows how to write them. Dodson is one of the greats and his work his does not disappoint.

And it’s terrific.

X-Men/Fantastic Four feels like a perfect story – a logical outgrowth of both titles and an unavoidable clash between two franchises.

The book itself is pitch perfect. Every character’s voice is spot on. The story is compelling. The arc feels essential.

About how many crossovers can one say that?

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: January 31 – February 4, 2020

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Justice League #39

Writer: Scott Snyder

Artist: Jorge Jimenez, Daniel Sampere

The tandem art team of Jorge Jimenez and Daniel Sampere is so very much up to the challenge for the final issue of this arc of Justice League that, as excited as I am for the next team to take over, I know that I am going to miss what they – especially Jimenez – brings to the book. He has a truly amazing ability, not unlike writer Scott Snyder, to weave giant action, lean into strum und drang while making each member of the Justice League distinct and unique, both in and out of costume. His work here had rocketed him to super stardom and this is an well deserved orbit. I will miss his work here.

I’ve written about Snyder many, many times in the past. He is one of my favorite writers, and I am not just talking about comic book writers. His ability to weave themes – to seed them and bring them to fruition sometimes issues, sometimes arcs, sometimes years later – is unparalleled and his grasp of character – making each hero speak with her or his own voice, is a remarkable skill. His Justice League has been about big action, big themes, big arcs, to be sure, but it has thrived because of his understanding of what makes these people tick.

This has been an incredible, mind-bending journey and, while I am sorry to see it end, I am thrilled with how it came together. DC let Snyder (and co-writer/collaborator James Tynion IV) swing for the fences.

They didn’t just clear them. They broke through them.

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: January 22 – 28, 2020

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Wonder Woman #750

Writer: Various

Artist: Various

Though I haven’t been a regular reader of the title of late, Wonder Woman #750 was a must purchase because of the historic nature of the issue. I am very, very glad I picked this up not only because of the importance achievement but because this book is beautifully realized by writers and artists who know and care about Diana and who understand her place in the world – both the fictional world of comic books and the real world in which we live.

Story-after-story illustrates this fact and each one takes a different spin on Wonder Woman and each one occupies a little corner of her broad universe and vast history.

One of the best parts of books like this one is the combinations of writers and artists that come together on occasions such as this and Wonder Woman #750 features some amazing work. There are three particularly affecting tales, written by Gail Simone, Marguerite Bennett and Greg Rucka that are as good as any ongoing comic on the stands today and the artwork that supports this book – drawn by the likes of Colleen Doran, Phil Hester and the criminally underrated Nicola Scott is breathtaking and bold.

The issue only has one problem and it’s not the issue’s fault. George Perez, who revitalized and redefined Wonder Woman in the 1980s has retired from the business and is, therefore, absent from these proceedings. This is a real shame and his absence is felt.

Wonder Woman #750 is a fitting tribute to one of the most important characters in the history of comic books. Here’s to 750 more issues!

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: January 15 – 21, 2020

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Undiscovered Country #3

Writer: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule

Artist: Giuseppe Camuncolli

I loved the first issue of Undiscovered Country. I disliked the second so much I thought of dropping the title. Now, I’ve selected the third as the best book I read last week. I don’t know what that really says except that I hope the fourth issue is more like the third!

There is a compelling story being told here. I am not sure I understand it all at this point, but I am very drawn in and invested. The plotting of the third issue was spot on, interlacing the present and the past brilliantly. I was also very impressed by the deeper character development this issue. And there were nuances added to all the cast that ratcheted up the suspense and the tension. I was lost in the second issue. I am hooked now.

Giuseppe Camuncolli is developed into a terrific artist. Leaving behind some of the more kinetic panels with which he approached Spider-Man, a character for whom kinetics are key, Camuncolli has given weight to each creation here and clearly was involved in their inception. The little details are well rendered and the backgrounds are filled with detail.

The entire book is filled with the kind of detail that I know will be important… I just have to figure out why. Undiscovered Country is a bit out of my comfort zone for comic reading and I am really enjoying it.

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: January 8 – 14, 2020

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Batman #86

Writer: James Tynion, IV

Artist: Tony S. Daniel

Talk about your tough acts to follow…

James Tynion, IV takes over Batman after a truly epic and inspiring run by Tom King – a run that reset Batman continuity, redefined relationships for the character and redirected the course of history for the Dark Knight and he knocks his debut issue out of the park.

Making a decision that had to be conscious not to mimic the style of King, Tynion instead takes the situations with which King left him and spins the beginnings of a new Batman story that has all the makings of being just as epic while seeming tonally and pleasing different as King’s run.

And there the comparisons should cease.

Over his years at DC, Tynion has proven himself a deft writer of small beats and big moments, a writer who understands the history of those he’s writing without being slavish to that history. He is setting up at a new angle to Gotham City and to Batman and clearly has his own, grand-scale plans in mind. It will be exciting to watch.

Providing the pencils in one of the most under appreciated artists of recent memory – Tony S. Daniel. His work across the DC Universe has been stunning for years and he is in top form in Batman #86. I believe his command of this character and his world makes him one of the defining Batman artists and he will eventually be mentioned in the same breath as Aparo and Adams. He should be. His work here is tremendous and I hope we have issue-after-issue of Daniel to come.

It’s also worth noting that the coda written by Tynion and illustrated by Guillem March is engaging, chilling and a terrific hook.

Amazing start here, gentlemen. Looking forward to the run!

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: January 1 – 7, 2020

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was X-Men #4

Writer: Jonathan Hickman

Artist: Leinil Francis Yu

I have been digging if not completely understanding Jonathan Hickman’s take on the X-Men. And that’s okay. There are many things I don’t understand that I like… Frankly, I like when an author is smarter than I am (not that that is a particularly mean feat). When the story is more complex or unpredictable than I can write yet holds together with a clear internal logic, I am all in.

Hickman has changed almost everything about the X-Men. It feels to me almost like a Moore/Gibbons treatment of the Charlton characters than a reboot of a classic Marvel team. Though I happened to enjoy much of the X-Men mythos before this reboot, I have been all in on this X-Men relaunch.

And this has been my favorite issue of the bunch. What a tour de force of force. In changing the character’s relationships and societal status, Hickman is giving readers an utterly off-the-wall and unpredictable corner of the Marvel Universe.

Give me more… though I am very anxious to see what happens when this flavor of X-Men interacts with the more traditional characters populating Marvel Comics. That should be very interesting, indeed.

One surprising reaction I am having is to the normally distinctive work of Leinil Francis Yu. It seems he is pulling back from an earlier style – or developing as an artist from it – and that is obviously his call. His work, though – for me – has lost something of the uniqueness it had. It is not that it’s not solid, it’s just that is is simply solid.

That being said, a solid and monthly Yu is better than most artists in the business and X-Men is better than most books.

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