Category Archives: Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 22 – 28, 2019

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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Action Comics #1011

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis

Artists:  Steve Epting

Brian Michael Bendis has been building his Superman stories to the Event Leviathan and this installment is top notch. Plot threads are coming together and the stakes feel appropriately high as we reach the start of the Event Levithan miniseries. 

What I really enjoy about Bendis’ take on Superman is that his interpretation of the character is grounded. This seems to be a very difficult balance to pull off but Bendis handles it beautifully His Superman is Clark Kent in costume and Clark Kent is a husband, father and hero. Approaching the character in this fashion is something that few authors can handle. Bendis makes it look easy.

Steve Epting is a tremendous addition to both Action Comics and to the DC Universe. His realistic style goes hand-in-hand with this story. But when superpowers are in play, he delivers and the contrast between the more talky panels and his approach to action is wonderful. 

Superman hasn’t been in this good of hands in years.

 

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Filed under Action Comics, Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Superman, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 15 – 21, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Batman #71

Writer: Tom King

Artists: Jorge Fornes, Michael Janin

The saga that is the latest breaking of the Batman written by Tom King is rapidly approaching its conclusion and the Bat-Band is getting back together… if any of what is seemingly going on can be trusted. So twisty (in a very good way) is King’s writing that it is difficult to rely on what is being presented on the pages. That is just fine. King has developed a vernacular for Batman which incorporates the best of Grant Morrison and Scott Snyder and strikes an impressive middle ground between the two iconic Batman writers.

The art in the King run has been consistently amazing and this month’s edition upholds the standard. Michael Janin gets better with each passing issue, sometimes evolving panel-to-panel. Paired this month with Jorge Fornes’ David Mazzuchelli homages, Janin really shines. This book would be terrific even in the hands of lesser artists. That it is drawn by quality pencillers like these is simply a bonus.

I will read this entire arc again as it concludes so that I can more readily see the pieces fit together. This could be King’s best Batman work yet…

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 8 – 14, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was The Flash #70

Writer: Joshua Williamson

Artists: Howard Porter

There has not, in my opinion, been a good, Year One, series-within-a-series in quite a while. Writer Joshua Williamson along with penciller Howard Porter aim to change that with an arc beginning in this months issue of The Flash.

They are off to a good start.

Porter has been in the DC stable of artists for over 20 years and his work has moved from being overly cartoony to a more draftsman-like approach while still maintaining the gonzo edge he brought to his breakout work on Justice League in the ’90s. His style suits The Flash very well and he and Williamson are clearly a nice fit.

Williamson has a handle on the Barry Allen Flash and developing a new backstory for the character (one whose call back and visuals hew closely and smartly to the CW TV series) is right up his alley.

Eschew a more traditional simple flashback approach to the story, Williamson is weaving mysteries of both the past and the future into his Year One and the narrative looks like it will greatly benefit from this approach.

Will the arc get me to start buying The Flash regularly again? Time will tell…

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: April 30 – May 7, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Fantastic Four #9

Writer: Dan Slott

Artists: Aaron Kruder, Stefano Caselli, Paco Medina

I love it when all hope seems lost, the stakes are high, the world is in peril and the heroes are at the hands of the villain, sure to go down in ignominious defeat… and then they rise. It’s a trope, but it’s a great one and Dan Slott plays it so very well in Fantastic Four #9. He has a terrific handle on the Fantastic Four and, more importantly, has a sense of what their powers can really do. He’s using them in new and creative ways and that is saying something for a team as old as the FF. One could argue that it’s all been done with a long running title like Fantastic Four, but Slott is finding new ways to be, well, fantastic.

The only draw back here is I’d like a full issue by Aaron Kruder. It’s not that Casellin and Medina aren’t good, it’s just that Kruder’s style seems tailor made for the book. Perhaps I would simply like one consistent artist throughout an issue. All are good. One would be better.

Fantastic Four is rapidly becoming fantastic (second pun) and that’s a good thing for the Marvel Universe.

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Filed under Comic Books, DC Comics, Fantastic Four, Marvel Comics, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: April 23 – 29, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Heroes in Crisis #8

Writer: Tom King

Artists: Mitch Gerads and Travis Moore

It’s force of habit now. Heroes in Crisis will be the pick in a month as well. You can count on it.

I’ve written much about the writing of this series and the intricacies of following this sprawling, Tom King penned epic. And there were ANSWERS in this issue, but the answers, of course generated more questions. When we get to issue #9, perhaps we will know all.

I’ll be sure to report that here.

By-the-way, the art on this series has been incredible throughout. Clay Mann (not featured in this issue), Travis Moore and Mitch Gerads have been utterly incredible and untouchable here. Impressive, impressive stuff!

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: April 17 – 23, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Batman #69

Writer: Tom King

Artists: Yanick Paquette

The magic that is Tom King continues in Batman #69. What distinguishes this issue from the highly enjoyable installments that have recently preceded it is that this one begins to be less atmospheric and more plot driven.

Don’t get me wrong – I have been utterly wrapped up in the atmospherics and have selected Batman as the best read of the month more times than not. However, I have noted in most of those reviews that my grasp of the plot of the title has been limited at best.

That changed with the gorgeously illustrated Batman #69. Yanick Paquette, another artist that writer Tom King has managed to add to the stable of incredible pencillers on this run, has outdone himself with an issue that spans the length and breadth of the Batman/Catwoman connection. It looks absolutely amazing and Paquette belongs on Batman in one form or another.

The pieces King has put on the chessboard are coming into focus – their roles and their reasons are becoming clear. And, suddenly, I don’t want the story to end.

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: April 10 – 16, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Batman #68

Writer: Tom King

Artists: Amanda Conner

While I must admit that the current arc (much of which I don’t fully comprehend which is supposed to be part of the fun) is wearing on me a bit, what Tom King does in Batman is better than most of what is out on the market these days and his particular way of twisting painful knives into the readers’ hearts must, on some level, be admired. The set up to a massive downfall for Batman is playing out in a long, slow burn, but it is giving King an opportunity to revisit the many highlights of his time with Batman and that is just fine with me. I don’t have to understand everything as it plays out, I simply want to be able to follow along.

And I can.

Is it possible that Amanda Conner’s art is too pretty for this book? It is surely too pretty for the dark tones and sense of foreboding that accompanies the title these days but, let’s be honest, it’s also perfect, so where is the quibble? Conner is a successor to both Kevin McGuire and Adam Hughes and she combines the best of what each does. I am certain there is not a better humorist drawing comics today. Any time we get a full issue of interiors from Conner is a blessed day!

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