Tag Archives: Geoff Johns

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: September 4 – 10, 2019

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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Doomsday Clock #11

Writer: Geoff Johns

Artist: Gary Frank

I love the word “penultimate” and am happy to use it here: in the penultimate issue of DC Comics’ Doomsday Clock, the winding narrative and dare I say brilliant homage to the classic Watchmen is almost at an end and writer Geoff Johns and artist Gary Frank have maintained such a high quality narrative that the book can almost be forgiven the lateness in its shipping schedule.

Almost.

The challenge, especially this week, is that comics that were intended to spin out of Doomsday Clock – such as Millennium – have made the stands before the story is concluded and an already confusing DC continuity is all the more jumbled.

However, judged solely on its own merits, Doomsday Clock remains one of the best books of the last two years and, when its final issue is release, will deserve the kind of trade paperback reverence that other books like this receive.

It will also require a review-in-full. And it will get one.

As it still seems poised to re-make the audience’s understanding of the DC Universe, it will deserve one.

 

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: June 5 – 11, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Young Justice #6

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis

Artist:  John Timms

There were more “important” issues this week. There were more classic issues this week. But no comic this week made me smile as much as Young Justice #6. I was not a major fan of Young Justice during its heyday, I will admit, but I simply love what Brian Michael Bendis is doing with the characters. While I certain he has a plan to re-introduce them to the world and to the other heroes in the DC Universe, he has decided to drop readers and the team into the middle of impossible action and sort things out later.

Awesome.

The art by John Timms is absolutely the perfect counterpoint to the story and he captures young people amazingly well which I have noted in other installments must be harder to do than one might think as so many artists seem to have so much trouble doing so. I hope Timms stays around on the book.

And I hope readership is solid. Young Justice is fun, funny and over-the-top. It’s a perfect summer comic book!

 

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 29 – June 4, 2019

Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The Best Comic I Read Last Week Was Doomsday Clock #10

Writer: Geoff Johns

Artists:  Gary Frank

This is the issue I have been waiting for. This issue redefines how the DC Universe functions, how we look at it and how it will proceed for years to come. This is Geoff Johns at the top of his game and Gary Frank turning in the best art of his amazing career. This is what we all signed on for and, if we can allow for the amount of time between issues, we can embrace Doomsday Clock as, perhaps, the best book of the year. Maybe of the last five.


Geoff Johns’ encyclopedic knowledge of the DC Universe has never been on better display than it is here. The manner in which he treats the various retconned origins of Superman and the ramifications of each action of Dr. Manhattan is breathtaking. If the plan was not present before this issue, it surely is now.

Gary Frank should be nominated and win an Eisner for his work on Doomsday Clock. Yes, it has taken time. YES, it is worth it.

This is the seminal book of the DC Universe at the moment. I hope the publisher follows through on the promise of it.

 

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: March 28 – April 3, 2018


Related Content from And There Came A Day:


I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

Capture

The best comic I read last week was Doomsday Clock #4

Writer: Geoff Johns

Artist: Gary Frank

Here is what I did not expect when Doomsday Clock was announced: I did not expect that it would be a straight-up sequel to the seminal Watchmen. Rather, I thought DC would focus its energies on a crossover of the Watchmen and DC Rebirth universes. While the later is occurring in Doomsday Clock in fits and starts, the former is much more in evidence.

And that is a shockingly good thing. Don’t misunderstand me: I am looking forward to the universes colliding, but this series has been such a testament to what a good writer Geoff Johns is and has been such a terrific sequel to the source material that I can wait a bit on that.

And, at this point I trust it goes without saying, that Gary Frank is spectacular. His work here is career defining. He is not aping original Watchmen artist Dave Gibbons at all and that is a good choice. Rather, his hyper-realism is the perfect match to the subject.

Doomsday Clock is firing on all cylinders. What a terrific book.

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Filed under Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Geoff Johns, Marvel Comics, Watchmen, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: January 24 – 30, 2018


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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

 

One

The best comic I read last week was Doomsday Clock #3

Writer: Geoff Johns

Artist: Gary Frank

All comics should feel as weighty. All should be as well drawn. All should take as many risks. All should be as smart. All should have consequences. All should involve readers as readily.

All comics should be as good as Doomsday Clock.

They are not. I read ten comics this week and none of them came close (though Marvel Two-in-One is pretty damned good). Doomsday Clock is expertly illustrated, brilliantly written and constructed in such a taut, engaging fashion that I greeted the news that (released earlier this week) that it is moving to a bi-monthly schedule with an audible “oh, no.”

It is the best comic I have read in a long-long time. And it is a comic I am already excited to read over-and-over again.

While I am having a very hard time placing it within the confines of the current DC Universe (and that is, likely, part of the point) and while I am sure I do not comprehend all the allusions, twists and turns, I am sure of one thing: it is an instant classic.

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: September 30 – October 6, 2015

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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

I read 5 comics last week: Captain America: White #2, Justice League #44, Batman Annual #4, Superman #44  and Grayson Annual #2.

The best comic I read last week was Justice League #44.

Justice League 44

I guess we can pencil in Justice League as the best comic I read in any week it comes out for the foreseeable future or, at least, until the end of “The Darkseid War” arc. It’s not surprising that this title is so good. I’ve chosen it for the last four months in a row, what’s surprising is how surprising the events in the book are.

For “universe changing events” like the ones being chronicled in Justice League, readers normally have to invest in a company-wide crossover series. That’s not the case here. Geoff Johns (I guess it helps when you’re a vice president of the company for which you write) is delivering high stakes events that would seem to have significant repercussions that will affect the DC Universe long after the conclusion of “The Darkseid War.”

Each month I extol the work of Jason Fabok, thinking that he must be topping out at some point. I mean, how much better can the guy get? Well, take a look at his Joker panels in this issue. They are simply scary good and scary-scary! As I’ve noted, his deft handling of so-called “wide-screen” action is superb and his is rendering of smaller moments – not that there are many small moments in Justice League #44.

The best way to review this issue is to marvel at the following:

  • The revelation that the Joker might be a god!
  • Wonder Woman’s terrific narration (GREAT choice for the window into the story, Mr. Johns!).
  • Mister Miracle. Everything about him from the costume redesign to the manner in which he’s written.
  • The coloring of the book!
  • Superman and Lex Luthor – it’s almost like they’re in another, very cool, story all together! Will Superman really kill Lex Luthor? I think we know the answer to that, but, do we?
  • Batman and his new (Mobius Chair) Batmobile.
  • Hal Jordan back with the League.

I could go on and note that all the characters, from the League to the villains to the supporting cast, are getting their moments, but I think we know how much I loved this issue.

And how much I can’t wait for the next one.

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Filed under Batman, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Geoff Johns, Jason Fabok, Justice League, Marvel Comics, Superman

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: August 19 – 25, 2015


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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

I read 7 comics last week: Superman/Wonder Woman #20, Justice League #43, Robin: Son of Batman #3, Black Canary #3, Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #4, Star Wars #8, and Age of Ultron vs. Marvel Zombies #3.

The best comic I read last week was Justice League #43.

Justice League 43

I think I like this idea DC Comics is putting forward called “loose continuity” and Justice League writer Geoff Johns is embracing the concept fully in the “Darkseid War” arc currently unfolding in the pages of this book. In this new continuity light model, it doesn’t matter that Jim Gordon is in the Batman suit in the Batman books, that Superman is de-powered and has been revealed to be Clark Kent in the Superman titles, that Wonder Woman has a new costume or that Hal Jordan is no longer a Green Lantern. No. What matters here is story on a grand scale.

One of the staples of early Justice League stories (and we’re talking Gardener Fox days early) was the pairing off of leaguers in different combinations having them go after different objectives in the same issue. There is a bit of that going on in The Darkseid War and it’s working very well – especially the Superman/Luthor pairing. Further, Johns has found a terrific narrator for this arc in Wonder Woman who has, perhaps, benefited the most from the New 52 reboot of a few years back. Johns has a great handle on her and her place in the overall DC universe seems much more clearly defined than it was before the New 52.

In this arc, she is the voice that is grounding the story and that’s a good thing as Batman has, apparently, become a God and Superman has, apparently, given in to evil. That leaves Wonder Woman as the only member of the so-called trinity to keep things afloat. A very cool concept, indeed.

Jason Fabok, who I mention each time this book is my favorite read of the week (which seems to be every month these days), is emerging as a superstar artist here. His action shots are as stunning as his character moments and he has made Mister Miracle, one of my favorite characters, look and feel dangerous and compelling. It is obvious how much his work has grown over his run on the book and it is equally clear that he and Johns are playing to each others’ strengths. This is as good a writer/artist partnership as there is in comics right now (especially considering that the Waid/Samnee run on Daredevil is coming to an end) and I hope they stay on Justice League for a very long time.

Justice League ought to be one of DC’s top books. Johns and Fabok are ensuring that it is.

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Filed under Batman, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Justice League, Marvel Comics, Superman