Tag Archives: Marvel Comics

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: July 11 – 17, 2018


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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The best comic I read last week was Amazing Spider-Man #1

Writer: Nick Spencer

Artist: Ryan Ottley

Do not misunderstand this choice: Superman #1 by Brian Michael Bendis and Ivan Reis is a really, really good book. It is creative and inventive and charts a new course for the Man of Steel.

But Nick Spencer and Ryan Ottley’s Amazing Spider-Man #1 (#802) is a simply perfect first issue of a new era for the Web-Spinner.

Following Dan Slott’s epic run is no enviable task, but Spencer and Ottley sure seem up to it. They have crafted a prologue that is engaging, that established a new status quo (in a brilliant manner) and that paves the way for years of story lines to come. I hope Spencer – who can tend to the controversial, quick burn (“Hail Hyrda,” anyone?) is in this for the long term. He has both Spider-Man and Peter Parker’s voices down and manages to put Peter in the best place for the character – as a lovable loser. But he also gives the perfect, Parker twist to the proceedings.

I know of Ryan Ottley only from his Invincible reputation – no pun intended. Though his art skews a bit to the cartoonish for my typical tastes, it is perfect for the subject matter and once I settled in to his interpretations, I let go and enjoyed the work, which is solid. He is a great fit for Spider-Man.

It is no mean feat to follow a master but this is an auspicious beginning. Tonally different from Slott’s run, but perfectly Spidey, Amazing Spider-Man #1 puts the book to the top of the read pile every month.

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Filed under Amazing Spider-Man, Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Spider-Man, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: June 20 – 26, 2018


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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The best comic I read last week was Justice League #2.

Writer: Scott Snyder

Artist: Jorge Jimenez

Close, close, close week. And that’s a good thing. I really only want to read good comics (or bad comics I think are good!). This week, the virtual hold slot is brimming with good comics and it came down to a close race among Batman #49, Man of Steel (why are people hating on this?) #4 and Justice League #2.

Justice League #2 won out because it is simply too wild, too wide screen, too good to ignore.

If you are looking for a comic book that is beautifully drawn, look no further. If you are looking for a comic book with an A-List line up, here’s your title. If you are looking for a comic book that is creative, challenging and compelling, pick up Justice League.

What a remarkable book this is. Scott Snyder deserved the keys to the kingdom and he is already adding elements to the JLA myth that will be around for years to come. His influence and the manner in which he is writing the characters is not unlike Geoff Johns or, perhaps, Grant Morrison. This is a powerful league. This is a powerful book.

And how can one go wrong with the rotating art team of Jimmy Cheung and Jorge Jimenez? Jimenez shines this issue and has deserved a spotlight like this one for a very, very long time.

All cylinders. That is what this book is clicking on. Each and every one of them.

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Filed under Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Justice League, Marvel Comics, Scott Snyder, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: June 13 – 19, 2018


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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

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The best comic I read last week was Mister Miracle #9.

 

Writer: Tom King

Artist: Mitch Gerads

Mitch Gerads is a New God.

Period.

His work is a perfect blend between the spectacular and the mundane. And that is a compliment. He is the perfect fit for Mister Miracle.

And I know.

It is Tom King. Again.

I know, I know.

But YOU know if you are reading his books.

I may not fully understand Mister Miracle. I may not have given it the time it deserves. But, man, it sticks with me after I have read it.

I have decidedly – arbitrarily – that I will not re-read it until the series concludes. Then I will block out the requisite time, sit down and re-read this epic all over again.

I cannot wait.

This is a team I will follow to any company, any book, any character.

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Filed under Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 30 – June 5, 2018


Related Content from And There Came A Day:


I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The best comic I read last week was Doomsday Clock #5.

 

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Writer: Geoff Johns

Artist: Gary Frank

This is the first week in a long time that every comic could have been selected as the best of the week – as my favorite read. Momentous issues like Man of Steel #1 and No Justice #4 were excellent and anniversary issue Amazing Spider-Man #800 was spectacular.

None wowed me like Doomsday Clock #5. This is the issue I have been waiting for – the one that clearly weaves the narratives of the Watchmen universe and the DC Rebirth universe together, and the wait was worth it.

Gary Frank continues to amaze and, though I wish he was a bit quicker at the art board so that Doomsday Clock could be monthly (and I do worry about the disruption to the DC line that the delays here will cause) his work is a perfect successor and tribute to Dave Gibbons’ original draftsmanship on Watchmen. He is an artist to follow on any title.

I have written about Geoff Johns frequently in this feature, so I will not repeat myself praising him. What I will say is there is something exciting and liberating about reading an adult-pitched (in tone, plot and language) DC story by Johns. He is so good at Golden Age superheroics that is is something to see him embrace a modern tone so completely.

This is a terrific book and one that will be amazing when collected in trade.

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Filed under Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 23 – 29, 2018


Related Content from And There Came A Day:


I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The best comic I read last week was Invincible Iron Man #600.

Untitled

Writers: Brian Michael Bendis

Artist: Various

When I noted this book was in my weekly subscriptions, I had a feeling it would end up as the Pick of the Week for a number of reasons: the character, the arc and the writer.

Iron Man’s renaissance from the 2008 Marvel Studios film (the one that spawned the cottage industry) seems to know no end. Iron Man has ever been a character I have enjoyed, but Marvel has rightly focused on him and he has become the face of the comic book line in many ways. I have been very happy to follow him.

The 600th issue of Iron Man also serves to conclude a long-running arc. Typically, these issues, unless they are utterly mismanaged, tend to be very good. Iron Man #600 is no exception.

But it is Brian Michael Bendis that puts this book to the top of my pile this week. The long-time Marvel writer has decamped for DC (which is very exciting) and Iron Man #600 marks his last work at his former company. It also marks the end of a long running arc and Bendis ties up all kinds of loose ends in this one. Throughout his career, he has seemed to fall in love with the characters he writes, and Iron Man is no exception. He has added to Tony Stark’s story in important ways, created new characters that will be around Iron Man’s world for years to come and influenced the direction of the entire Marvel line from this title. He has commanded the participation of top artists because of his talent. He has made Iron Man a best seller and a wonderful book.

I will miss him on the character, though I am excited to see what he can do with the relatively obscure DC character he is taking over… what is that guy’s name again?

Oh, yeah. Superman.

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Filed under Comic Book Movies, Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Iron Man, Marvel Comics, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 15 – 22, 2018


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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The best comic I read last week was Batman #47.

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Writers: Tom King

Artist: Tony Daniel

After reading only 4 comics last week, I had a more typical number this week and the books were all very good. There were a number of compelling titles this week including New Challengers and No Justice, but the conclusion of the arc entitled “The Gift” in Batman was too perfect (and heartbreaking) to pass up.

Tony Daniel belongs on Batman. His refined style and expressive work is a terrific compliment to the caped crusader. That he is back on the book with a more developed and confident approach than he used when he was working with Grant Morrison a few years back in one of the craziest of Batman heydays serves to establish him as one of the best Batman artists of a generation. His work alone is reason to buy the book.

Tom King wraps up the penultimate chapter of the wedding of Batman and Catwoman by doing something that I would have thought was impossible: he made Batman’s origin even more gut wrenching. The addition to the story, for as long as it lasts before some other writer comes along to continuity wipe it, is so perfectly Batman and so deliciously tragic. King’s Batman has been spot on and, what I most like about what he is doing, is that each arc he has written offers a different flavor and different take on the character. With King writing, the reader never knows what to expect.

That is a very good thing and this is a very good and very consistent book.

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Filed under Batman, Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: May 9 – 14, 2018


Related Content from And There Came A Day:


I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

The best comic I read last week was No Justice #1.

 

Comics

Writers: Scott Snyder, Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV

Artist: Francis Manapul

Spinning out of the events of DC Metal comes No Justice, a weekly mini series that itself will launch a new iteration of Justice League. This is a cosmic, spare-faring, high stakes story that promises to change the DC Universe forever. Those kinds of claims are made frequently in comics, but this book seems to want to deliver and writers Snyder, Williamson and Tynion IV may well be the men to do it.

This is a book that features the genesis of four different Justice League teams facing off against all-powerful, cosmic antagonists. The teams were assembled by none other than Superman villain Brainiac and each is designed for specific and unknown reasons.

Oh, and they contain supervillains as well.

Great stuff!

The art by Manapul is not put to his usual creative brilliance and he seems to be working to someone else’s strictures and script, but any Manapul is good Manapul and the book looks great.

This is the start of something big.

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Filed under Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Justice League, Marvel Comics, Weekly Comic Book Review