Tag Archives: Marvel Comics

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: September 13 – 19, 2017


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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

 

OneTwo

The best comic I read last week was DC Metal #2.

Writer: Scott Snyder

Artists: Greg Capullo

DC Metal is simply the most bizarre, most out-there, most fun comic book I have read in a very long time. The superstar team of Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo are putting together a story for the ages – a book that is going to be referenced for years to come. They are also tying up loose plot threads from their previous work… threads that most fans did not even realize were dangling!

I cannot begin to explain all the proceedings here. They are too complex – too crazy – to try to distill for this review. Rather, what I can say is this is a comic book lover’s comic. It is an ode to the 1970s, a time where all kinds of unhinged things could happen in a comic, where dinosaurs and space-women and Challengers of the Unknown existed side-by-side in vibrant four colors.

For a long time – for over a decade – creators have been trying to make comics into something new. Writers and artists of great skill have deconstructed the genre to develop something different, something deep, something important. And I have loved many of those books and embraced many of those experiments.

But, bravo Snyder and Capullo for making a comic that looks like a comic, smells like a comic and reads like a comic.

DC Metal is an awesome ride. It is the kind of ride that, if you do not get on, it will surely run you over.

Get on Metal!

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Filed under Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: August 30 – September 5, 2017

 Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

 

OneTwo

The best comic I read last week was Secret Empire #10.

Writer: Nick Spencer

Artists: Steve McNiven

Last week, it was Secret Empire #9 and I just did not have the heart to leave #10 out this week if only because it’s all over!

And that is a good thing.

Frankly, Secret Empire ends up acquitting itself very nicely. And while it seems, if I am reading between the appropriate lines, that the status quo of the Marvel Universe is largely unchanged at the conclusion of the story line – which we have come to expect from these events – the ride was a good one.

Yes, heroic Cap seems to be back, though he has a lot of explaining to do and no amount of angst to work through. Yes, the heroes have triumphed, but there is much rebuilding to be done – both physically and psychically.

As it turns out, Nick Spencer has delivered a surprisingly self-contained narrative. I read only the tie-ins to which I was already subscribed and feel I got a full scope and sequence of the story. That is a good thing.

And so is returning Steve Rogers to being Steve Rogers. Though some good stories were had with Hydra Cap, it never felt right. This does.

The return of Steve McNiven to finish this off is a good choice and, even though he is not quite at Fantastic Four and Civil War standards, his line work is crisp and his character work more than serviceable. One wishes he was on the full series.

Secret Empire may not be my favorite Marvel-wide crossover, but it is far better than the last few we have received. That, in-and-of-itself, is a noteworthy accomplishment.

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Filed under Captain America, Captain America: Civil War, Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: August 16 – 22, 2017


Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

OneTwoThree

 

The best comic I read last week was DC Metal #1.

Writers: Scott Snyder

Artists: Greg Capullo

They are back!

And I do not know what the hell is going on… but I like it. A lot!

DC Metal is a universe spanning crossover by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo, far and away the most successful creative team from DC’s The New 52. One might contend (I might be the one) that their run on Batman changed the character and comics in very significant ways.

Now they are out to surprise the comic world anew with DC Metal and I am just so thrilled to be along for this particular ride.

And what a ride it is… beginning in medias res in Mongol’s Warworld arena with an epic battle, DC Metal does not break its stride for the full, oversized debut issue. Taking on long dormant concepts while introducing new ones, Capullo and Snyder are telling a story that seems to have no limits in the very best way.

It is crazy. It is full screen.

It is a hell of a lot of fun.

DC Metal #1 is not perfect. There is so much going on that it is hard to keep track of it all, but it is too much of a thrill-ride to quibble. When you see the Justice League fight dinosaurs in a Voltron-like apparatus, why complain?

What makes the story really cook (beyond the stunning rendering by Capullo) is the depth of what is going on. If one has read Snyder, one senses him pulling together many a thread with this book. That is an exciting prospect.

Great art. Great story. Great set pieces.

I cannot wait for issue #2.

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Filed under Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: August 9 – 15, 2017


Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

OneTwo

 

The best comic I read last week was Mister Miracle #1.

Writers: Tom King

Artists: Mitch Gerads

Please go buy this comic. Please make it sell out. Please… so they will make more…

Actually, you do not need to do that. DC Comics will make more. They will make 11 more. Mister Miracle is 12 issue, in continuity mini series (in the good old days, they used to call this a “maxi series”) that reintroduces Mister Miracle, the love of his life Big Barda, Oberon (I think!) and the New Gods to the world of DC Comics Rebirth.

And what a reintroduction it is.

I have loved King on Batman. Please see any of the Best Sequential Art reviews of done over the last year for the proof. I loved the Vision series he did for Marvel.

The litmus test for me in my love of King, however, is the character Mister Miracle. I have always liked this Jack Kirby creation, but never loved him.

Until now.

What King does in one dense and brilliant issue is hook readers, whether they know Scott Free or not, into the story. One of King’s strengths is to get his readers guessing and there are plenty of plot twists and mini-cliff hangers here to propel us all into the next issue. The writing is top notch. Shock follows laugh follows tears follows shock.

What a ride.

Mitch Gerads is a long time partner of King and the two are well suited to each other. King’s writing tends to take crazy concepts and make them realistic and Gerads’ art bends towards a realistic style. That is going to be great fun in this title because, while most of this issue was earth and domestic based, one can bet (from the conclusion of the book at any rate) that it is going to be a far-flung romp before it is all over.

Mister Miracle was heavily hyped and for good reason. It is a terrific book.

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: August 1 – 8, 2017


Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

OneTwo

 

The best comic I read last week was Batman #28

Writers: Tom King

Artists: Michael Janin

Michael Janin is back.

Tom King is still writing.

The War of Jokes and Riddles continues.

Batman is one hell of a ride.

Here is the thing: King’s story is just fascinating. The manner in which he is playing his cards – for the very long game – is masterful. He continues to put Batman, a character with an over 75-year publishing history, into situations which are new, unexpected and breathtaking. That accomplishment, in-and-of-itself, is worth the top spot every other week.

What makes Janin’s art such a perfect compliment to King’s writing is how the artist tends toward the realistic. King’s writing, as gonzo as it is, is somehow, someway, rooted in realism. I am not sure of the writer’s process, but it seems as though he asks “what would happen to Batman if…” and then drafts the answers.

Powerful answers.

The focus here in on Jim Gordon and the role he will play in the Joker/Riddler war. Spoiler alert: it is going to be a painful one.

But not as painful as it will be for Batman himself.

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Filed under Batman, Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Uncategorized

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: July 19 – July 25, 2017


Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

OneTwo

The best comic I read last week was Batman #27

Writers: Tom King

Artists: Clay Mann

There was an amazing run (pun intended) of issues of the The Flash wherein writer Geoff Johns re-told stories of the Flash’s Rogues Gallery to make the villains seem less cartoonish and more, well, villain-like. These were effective and provocative stories – instant classics.

Batman #27 not only reminded me of those stories, it exceeded them in at least two ways: first, it took place in the overall telling of a remarkable arc (“The War of Jokes and Riddles”) and, second, it took one of the most ridiculous villains of ALL TIME – Kite Man – and made him something… more. Something dangerous. Something sad. Something… wrong.

Well done, Tom King. Each month you surprise and delight. I cannot wait for your Mister Miracle title and I will follow you to any book you are on.

King is so good that his work here overcomes the loss of his key artist. Clay Mann fills in for Michael Janin and, while Mann’s work is competent if not inspiring, it is simply not at the same standard as Janin (or rotating artist David Finch for that matter).

But even a sub-par effort on the art cannot detract from what is another special issue in what is a spectacular run.

Tom King should write all the comics.

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Filed under Batman, Comic Book Pick of the Week, Comic Book Review, Comic Books, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Uncategorized, Weekly Comic Book Review

The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: June 28 – July 4, 2017


Related Content from And There Came A Day:

I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

ThreeTwoOne

The best comic I read last week was 

Secret Empire #5.

Writer: Nick Spencer

Artists: Andrea Sorrentino and Rod Reis 

I have been burned by my own expectations when reading “big, event” comics from Marvel and DC in recent years. These are self-inflicted burns, to be sure. No one forces me to buy these events and no one sets my expectations higher than I.

It was with significant wariness that I approached Secret Empire especially considering that, at the heart of the story was the so-called “Hydra Cap” – the Captain America who believes he has been a Hydra sleeper agent for his entire life. He has taken down the heroes of earth by capturing them, by killing them, by stranding them off planet and he and his Hydra cronies are making their moves at world domination. I saw this description and I thought, eh, I read this before. From DC. When it was called Forever Evil and it was not terrific then.

But I still bought it.

The fifth issue has made me glad I did. It is here that the series has won me over. I am engaged in this story. I am enjoying the twists and turns and I am genuinely curious as to how it will all turn out. Spencer has woven any number of interesting threads into this narrative, and I am very intrigued to see it through to its conclusion. He has me guessing as a read and that is what I want from a comic.

The art in the series has been good, if uneven. I am not sure that Andrea Sorrentino is the right choice for this kind of packed panel, wide screen action. He is a good artist, to be sure, but his style better serves a smaller book, in my opinion.

Rod Reis has a few pages here, too, and they are discordant and set off from the main narrative. The discordance is intentional and Reis’ work is very good, perhaps so good that one wishes the two artists had flipped duties.

I will wait and see what comes out of Secret Empire, if it is the catalyst that shakes up the Marvel Universe or if it all too easily restores the status quo in it.

But, for now, I am interested and this was the book I thought about the most last week.

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