Tag Archives: Spider-Man

Yesterday – A Movie Review


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No movie is perfect but, for my taste, Yesterday comes very, very close. It is the most fun, most feel good, most fulfilled time I have had at the movies this summer. Without question.

Hamish Patel, delightful and charming, plays frustrated singer/guitarist Jack Malik. After a decade of playing D-List gigs at dumps and to empty rooms, he has all but given up his hope of becoming a professional singer when something strange happens. Hit by a bus during a strange, world-wide event, Jack awakens to discover that he is the only person on Earth who remembers the Beatles and their music. He begins to share their songs as if they were his own and rockets to stardom as a result.

In the process, he leaves behind his old friend and manager Ellie Appleton, played by the ubiquitous and delightful Lily James. Jack and Ellie have been working on his career ever since they were kids and knew each other in school and, as things finally take off for Jack, Ellie – a school teacher – has no choice but to stay behind and watch him from afar. The movie manages, however, to keep them onscreen together quite a lot, and this is a good thing. The two have great chemistry.

One cannot discuss the movie without a brief mention of the scenery chewing turn by Kate McKinnon. She is wonderfully terrible as Jack’s new manager and injects friendly venom in every line reading. And Ed Sheeran should be saluted, too, for his persona mocking work as himself.

Yesterday is a movie that is pure fantasy and knows it. It does not try to explain why people have forgotten the Fab Four (and forgotten other, amusing things, too) or what the global event was. It does not need to do so. It asks the audience to go along for the ride and quite a pleasant ride it is.

Richard Curtis, the writer of Love Actually is behind this movie and there are more than a few pleasant resonances from that film in this one. He has a knack for romantic comedy and a love of high concepts (as evidenced by his criminally underrated About Time). He imbues his characters with a sweetness that never crosses into cloying. He also is a lover of coincidence and that plot element is on display in Yesterday.

Directed with much style and a sure hand by Danny Boyle, the movie is a rollicking romp. It only asks for a suspension of disbelief and a desire to get caught up in a little magic. If you cannot do that, Yesterday is not the film for you. But, if you want some joy, want some romance and want some great music, this is the film for you. Yesterday knows exactly what it is. It also knows exactly what it wants to do: it wants to take its audience down to Strawberry Fields, where nothing is real, but everything is wonderful.

YESTERDAY receives FOUR AND A HALF YELLOW SUBMARINES out of a possible FIVE

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Spider-Man Far From Home – A SPOILER FREE Movie Review


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Once the full trailer for Spider-Man Far From Home was released and it became clear that the post-Avengers | Endgame setting was critical to the story, my expectations were altered. I went in to Far From Home feeling I was about to see an extension of Endgame that would clear up some ambiguities (like Spider-Man’s entire class was snapped out of existence?) and answer some questions (like how is the world coping with all the returning people?). The movie supplies some of those answers but flips the script and the tone from the Wagnerian epic that was Infinity War and Endgame so readily that I was caught off guard.

I shouldn’t have been. It is clear that these Spider-Man movies are meant to be, first-and-foremost, high school comedies. That the main character has super powers and is involved in a wider narrative is secondary to the story. Settling in to that perspective and watching Far From Home in that mindset changes my reactions to the movie.

In a bit of meta-casting, Jake Gyllenhaal, who was once rumored as the replacement for Tobey Maguire for Spider-Man 2, plays Mysterio, a superhero from a newly discovered alternate dimension. He has come to Spider-Man’s earth to warn of a new cosmic threat and to pitch in in defeating it. Gyllenhaal is game for the role and somehow seem at home in what is – without a doubt – the most silly Marvel costume yet. Dude is wearing a fishbowl on his head and he makes it work. He also shares a very nice chemistry with Tom Holland, who remains absolutely spot-on as Peter Parker/Spider-Man.

In this film, Peter is dealing with the events and the deaths of Avengers | Endgame and not even the quirky and engaging Aunt May (Marisa Tomei is ideal and having a great time in the part) and the suddenly gruffly lovable father figure Happy Hogan (played by Jon Favreau in increasingly and amusingly “I’m too old for this S%^& manner) can help. Peter is questioning his place in the superheroing world, the demands of an oddly out-of-character Nick Fury (always perfectly embodied by Samuel L. Jackson) and Maria Hill (once again realized by Cobie Smulders) notwithstanding. Rather than join Fury for superheroics, Peter dedicates himself to his fun group of classmates (Zendaya as MJ and Jacob Batalon as Ned are standouts) and to their summer trip to Europe. Friendly neighborhood Spider-Man no more!

It’s in Europe that things get complicated – really, really complicated – and Peter realizes, as any audience buying a ticket for a Spider-Man movie knew he must – that with great power comes…

The movie is breezily directed by Jon Watts and he clearly loves the material. Packed full of Easter eggs, Marvel comics references and clever dialogue, this is the most family friendly of the Marvel movies and the most action figure friendly, too. Spider-Man wears no fewer than four different costumes and faces more than a handful of adversaries in the course of the movie. Let’s mold plastic!

The drawback of the film might be a problem that challenges all Marvel movies going forward. Spider-Man Far From Home is the mind-boggling twenty-third film in the series and the baggage it carries is significant. With each passing installment, the pressure to amaze and thrill the audience while staying true to a broader tapestry is building and it makes this movie too clever by half. Many of the things that seem odd or out of place or shoehorned into the narrative only make any kind of sense when the after the credits sequences rolls (and I do mean AFTER the credits – stick around!). Don’t get me wrong. I love these movies and I love the interlocked nature of them. I am so impressed by the scope. It is simply that, for the first time in a long time, I felt the overall story of the main character was compromised by the needs of the franchise.

That does not mean I won’t be seeing Spider-Man Far From Home again, however!

SPIDER-MAN FAR FROM HOME receives THREE AND A HALF TINGLES out of a possible FIVE

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Countdown to ENDGAME | Spider-Man | Homecoming


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Captain America: The First Avenger | Iron Man | The Incredible Hulk| Iron Man II Thor | The Avengers | Iron Man 3 | Thor: The Dark World | Captain America: The Winter Soldier | Guardians of the Galaxy | Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | Avengers: Age of Ultron | Ant-Man | Captain America: Civil War | Doctor Strange | Spider-Man: Homecoming | Thor: Ragnarok | Black Panther | Avengers: Infinity War | Ant-Man and the Wasp | Captain Marvel

Spider-Man | Homecoming

SpiderMan

Tom Holland is perfect as Spider-Man. Perfect. Marvel directors seem to have unerring instincts in casting and their choice for Spider-Man (who debuted in Captain America: Civil War – a film creatively revisited in this one) in Tom Holland is spot-on. This is a very fun film and does a massive amount of world building while telling a compelling Spider-Man story, too. The filmmakers based their take on the high school movies of John Hughes, and they do a great job generating that vibe.

Spider-Man | Homecoming is absolutely jam-packed with delightful easter eggs… Bruce Banner’s picture on a classroom wall display of famous scientists, the principal of Peter’s school is the grandson of a solider who fought with Captain America in World War II, Captain America’s educational videos, the Sokovia Accords, Donald Glover (soon to explode as Lando Calrissian is on hand), Ferris Bueller’s Day Off is on screen, and Jennifer Connelly – the wife of Paul Bettany who provides the voice of J.A.R.V.I.S. and is the Vision – is the voice of Peter’s suit, which he names Karen. There are many more and, somehow, they do not overwhelm the movie.

Spider-Man | Homecoming also features one of the best Marvel villains in Michael Keaton’s Vulture. Fun, breezy and suitably Marvel, this is the second best of all Spider-Man movies (it does trail Spider-Man 2 by a pretty wide margin). It is also the most multi-cultural of all the Marvel movies (prior to Black Panther) and that casting serves it very well. There are a series of great set pieces here and the interplay between Spider-Man and Iron Man is fun to watch. It is so pervasive, however, that it does lead one to question whether Spider-Man will be able to carry his own movie.

Oh, and the twist ending is very, very well handled.

When Spider-Man | Homecoming opened, I gave it FOUR AND A HALF (because Holland is just SO good) FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOODS out of a possible FIVE.


KEY INTRODUCTIONS:

  • Adrian Toomes, The Vulture
  • Damage Control
  • MJ (Mary Jane, perhaps?)
  • The Shocker (two, in fact!)
  • Aaron Davis (the Prowler)
    • Miles Morales is referenced… he will become a Spider-Man, too!
  • Phineas Mason, The Thinker

CONNECTION(S) TO ENDGAME:

  • For a movie that almost immediately precedes Infinity War, there are surprisingly few lead ins to the movie, however…
  • The so-called Iron Spider armor is introduced at the end of the film when Peter turns down Avengers membership. He accepts it in Infinity War.
  • Tony Stark’s relationship with Pepper Potts seems very much back on after the “break” the two were on in Civil War… and we certainly know more given that they are engaged in Infinity War.
  • The new Avengers upstate New York headquarters features prominently in the last act. We will be seeing more of it in ENDGAME.

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Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse – A Movie Review


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CaptureMany reviews start out with a variation on the phrase “you’ve never seen anything like this” and, upon seeing the reviewed film, one may say to one’s self, “I’ve seen many, many things like this.” In the case of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse “you’ve never seen anything like this” might be true.

Bold, inventive, involving and charming, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is such a delightful film that it entices you to want to line back up, purchase another ticket and see it again. Within moments of the movie’s opening scenes, I was wondering, with all the technological skill and acumen at work in cinema these days, why this movie was not mounted as a live-action project for, surely, the fact that it is an animated movie will significantly limit its box office potential and draw. Anyone who reads my reviews knows that I am a fan of all things comic book in the movies and that I truly enjoyed the latest Spider-Man film Spider-Man: Homecoming. I write this with little fear of being contradicted: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is a far more fun and fulfilling movie than that one on every level.

Into the Spider-Verse just works. The visuals work. The story works. The soundtrack works. The humor works. The drama works. The family narrative works. It all works.

The movie tells the origin story of Miles Morales and how he becomes Spider-Man. “Wait,” you might be saying, “Miles Morales? Where’s Peter Parker?” Don’t you worry. Peter Parker is here, too. In fact, a couple Petes show up and, when they do, Into the Spider-Verse does not get bogged down into explaining why they have shown up when they have or why these particular spider-people have made the scene. It simply tells its story trusting that its audience is smart enough and willing to follow along. If you are not in those categories, 1) you may not have a soul and, 2) this is not the movie for you. Into the Spider-Verse does a quick and brilliant job with the superhero origin story but does so from the perspective that the audience has seen this before and doesn’t need to know about why there are radioactive spiders or women spider-people or spider-pigs for that matter. It just wants to sweep the audience up in its story and it wildly succeeds in doing so.

At the core of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is a story about family. Miles Morales is like many young people – loving his family but slightly embarrassed by them at the same time, craving his independence but reliant on advice from his elders. He does not know quite who he is or what he will become, but he is engaged in the process of finding out. That he is given superpowers at the same time is just one more problem to handle.

Miles Morales is a Spider-Man for our times, a mixed-race teenager who does not want the power when he receives it, is afraid to tell his parents what has happened to him (because, of course, he gained his power while doing something he should not have been doing) and simply wants to help – to do good. We can use more stories about characters like Miles and I hope we get them.

The voice cast featuring standout work by Shameik Moore as Miles and Jake Johnson as an aging Peter Parker are terrific. Listen for the voices of actors having a blast in this one. There are more than a handful that will surprise you. The direction by Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman is terrific and the movie takes the audience on a wonderful, break-neck paced joy ride that one does not wish to end too soon. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse might be (might be!) the best superhero movie released in 2018…

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE receives FIVE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-PIGS out of a possible FIVE

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: November 7 – 13, 2018


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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

 

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The best comic I read last week was Spider-Geddon #3

Writer: Cristos Gage

Artist: Carlo Barberi

Spider-Geddon is a nice story. It is well written and well drawn. It is fun.

It is not the best comic I read last week, but, on the day Stan Lee passed away, it seems appropriate to select an issue that, without him, wouldn’t even exist.

Lee created Spider-Man and, therefore, is responsible for all of the characters in this book.

ALL OF THEM.

There are few creators in any genre or art form as influential as Stan Lee, and I do not just mean in comic books. I mean in consciousness.

Excelsior, Stan. Thank you for my imagination.

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: October 10 – 16, 2018


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I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

Capture

The best comic I read last week was Spider-Geddon #1

Writer: Cristos Gage and Dan Slott

Artist: Jorge Molina

Off the wall, gonzo, over-the-top action. That’s what Spider-Geddon #1 delivers. With a title like that, it better, right?

Cristos Gage is working from ideas put in motion by Dan Slott in the neo-classic “Spider-Verse” story line (which also inspired this winter’s motion picture Spider-Man: Edge of the Spider-Verse animated film) and, in this case, good ideas are quite the fruitful playground. Focusing on the engaging Miles Morales Spider-Man, Gage connects the reader to a story that seems made to please. After establishing Morales as the Spider-Man of record, Gage introduces a handful of other Spider-People, giving each and identity and raison d art making the audience care about each. He handles the Superior Octavius very well.

And Jorge Molina is perfectly suited to the world of Spider-Man. His fluid characters blend seamless into creative panelling and the kinetic nature of the story matches what he is doing visually. This is a terrific example of the right artist being on the right book and character (in this case, characters) and Molina’s Spider-Man is a classic rendition. He is key to the success of this book.

Spider-Geddon looks as though it will be a fun ride and one that I am looking forward to taking.

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The Best Sequential Art I Read Last Week: July 25 – 31, 2018


Related Content from And There Came A Day:


I am a comic book collector and happy to be one. I might say “proud” if I hadn’t, over a year ago, switched to reading digital as opposed to print comics. I feel a bit robbed of the tactile sensations of the hobby – of the turn of the page, the sneaking look to the panel a page over, the bagging and shorting and stacking and filing. Though I read my comics in a different medium than I used to, I still treat each Wednesday (comic book delivery day to specialty shops around the country) as different from the other days of the week. I subscribe and now, rather than go to the comic store to be handed the books pulled for my “Hold Slot,” I click a button on my iPad and watch them download.

Then I read them.

Rare is the week that I don’t read them all between Wednesdays and some weeks I have, well… let’s just say more comic books in my digital downloads than a grown man should. Comic book legend Will Eisner (creator of The Spirit) is one of the most influential men even to put pencil to drawing board in the pursuit of making comics. So influential was he that the industry awards (think the Oscars or the Emmys or the Grammys) are named The Eisner Awards. He called comic books “sequential art,” perhaps because he became embarrassed by his profession when he had to admit what he did for a living. This is my weekly reaction to the comics I read.

Comics I Read Last Week:

Capture

The best comic I read last week was Amazing Spider-Man #2 (#803)

Writer: Nick Spencer

Artist: Ryan Ottley

Two issues in to this latest Spider-Man reboot, two times I have selected it as the Pick of the Week.

It is a very solid and fun book.

As I wrote upon the premiere issue, Ryan Ottley’s art is a perfect match for the adventures of Spider-Man and, as importantly, Peter Parker. It is a great balance between traditional comic art and over-the-top cartooning. That is a fine medium to strike for Spider-Man. He draws a long and lanky wall crawler, which is the way I like him, and he draws a truly creative and imposing Lizard. I am more impressed with this issue than I was with the first.

Nick Spencer has Spidey’s voice down pat. The humor does not feel forced, the heroism does not feel out of place and the scenes with Mary Jane feel all but perfect. Though there is some inexplicable outcry (can comic book fans ever be happy?) over the potential Mary Jane/Peter reunion, place me solidly in the happy for them camp. Spider-Man and Mary Jane belong together. Anything other than that feels force, in my opinion.

This is an auspicious, two issue, start for the new team and new direction.

Here is hoping they can keep it going!

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